Summary of study ST000878

This data is available at the NIH Common Fund's National Metabolomics Data Repository (NMDR) website, the Metabolomics Workbench, https://www.metabolomicsworkbench.org, where it has been assigned Project ID PR000609. The data can be accessed directly via it's Project DOI: 10.21228/M8Z679 This work is supported by NIH grant, U2C- DK119886.

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This study contains a large results data set and is not available in the mwTab file. It is only available for download via FTP as data file(s) here.

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Study IDST000878
Study TitleFatty Acid Oxidation is Impaired in An Orthologous Mouse Model of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease
Study SummaryAutosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD; MIM ID's 173900, 601313, 613095) is estimated to affect almost 1/1000 and is the most common genetic cause of end stage renal disease (Torres et al., 2007). While advances have been made in slowing the progression of some other forms of chronic kidney disease, standard treatments have not reduced the need for renal replacement therapy in ADPKD (Spithoven et al., 2014). Unfortunately, several experimental interventions also have recently failed to show significant benefit in slowing the rate of functional decline (Serra et al., 2010; Walz et al., 2010; Schrier et al., 2014; Torres et al., 2014), and the only positive study reported very modest effects (Torres et al., 2012). These findings suggest new treatment strategies are required. A central dogma of molecular genetics is that discovery of the causative genes will lead to identification of key pathways and potential targets for intervention. In the case of ADPKD, the two genes mutated in the disorder, PKD1 and PKD2, were identified almost 20 years ago and yet their functions remain poorly understood. The PKD1 gene product, polycystin-1 (PC1), encodes a large membrane protein that requires the PKD2 gene product, polycystin-2 (PC2), for its trafficking to the primary cilium where the two are thought to form a receptor channel complex (Kim et al., 2014; Cai et al., 2014). What the complex senses and what it signals remains controversial. The primary cilium has emerged as a key player in the pathogenesis of PKD as mutations in dozens of different genes that encode either essential ciliary components or factors in ciliary signaling pathways result in PKD. A recent report suggests that the relationship between the polycystin complex and ciliary signaling is complicated, however.While ablation of primary cilia by mutation of core ciliary components results in cysts, these same perturbations done in the setting of Pkd1 or Pkd2 inactivation results in significant attenuation of cystic disease (Ma et al., 2013). These data suggest that the polycystin complex provides a suppressive signal for a novel, cilia-dependent growth-promoting pathway that is independent of MAPK/ERK, mTOR, or cAMP pathways, three effector pathways previously implicated as major drivers of cyst growth. The identities of the growth-promoting and growth-inhibiting pathways remain unknown. We have taken a systems-based approach to study Pkd1 gene function. Building on our previous work identifying markedly different outcomes in animals with induced Pkd1 inactivation before or after P12 and correlating this susceptibility with metabolic status (Piontek et al., 2007; Menezes et al., 2012), we now show that female sex is partially protective in adult-induced Pkd1 inactivation, that sex differences in metabolic status may account for this effect, and that cells lacking Pkd1 have abnormal fatty acid oxidation. Finally, manipulating diet in Pkd1 mouse models, we demonstrate a positive correlation between lipid content in mouse chow and cystic kidney disease severity. Our results therefore suggest that abnormal lipid metabolism is an intrinsic component of PKD and an important modifier of disease progression.
Institute
University of California, Davis
DepartmentGenome and Biomedical Sciences Facility
LaboratoryWCMC Metabolomics Core
Last NameFiehn
First NameOliver
Address1315 Genome and Biomedical Sciences Facility, 451 Health Sciences Drive, Davis, CA 95616
Emailofiehn@ucdavis.edu
Phone(530) 754-8258
Submit Date2017-09-11
Raw Data AvailableYes
Raw Data File Type(s).cdf
Analysis Type DetailGC-MS
Release Date2017-11-11
Release Version1
Oliver Fiehn Oliver Fiehn
https://dx.doi.org/10.21228/M8Z679
ftp://www.metabolomicsworkbench.org/Studies/ application/zip

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Project:

Project ID:PR000609
Project DOI:doi: 10.21228/M8Z679
Project Title:Fatty Acid Oxidation is Impaired in An Orthologous Mouse Model of Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease
Project Summary:Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD; MIM ID's 173900, 601313, 613095) is estimated to affect almost 1/1000 and is the most common genetic cause of end stage renal disease (Torres et al., 2007). While advances have been made in slowing the progression of some other forms of chronic kidney disease, standard treatments have not reduced the need for renal replacement therapy in ADPKD (Spithoven et al., 2014). Unfortunately, several experimental interventions also have recently failed to show significant benefit in slowing the rate of functional decline (Serra et al., 2010; Walz et al., 2010; Schrier et al., 2014; Torres et al., 2014), and the only positive study reported very modest effects (Torres et al., 2012). These findings suggest new treatment strategies are required. A central dogma of molecular genetics is that discovery of the causative genes will lead to identification of key pathways and potential targets for intervention. In the case of ADPKD, the two genes mutated in the disorder, PKD1 and PKD2, were identified almost 20 years ago and yet their functions remain poorly understood. The PKD1 gene product, polycystin-1 (PC1), encodes a large membrane protein that requires the PKD2 gene product, polycystin-2 (PC2), for its trafficking to the primary cilium where the two are thought to form a receptor channel complex (Kim et al., 2014; Cai et al., 2014). What the complex senses and what it signals remains controversial. The primary cilium has emerged as a key player in the pathogenesis of PKD as mutations in dozens of different genes that encode either essential ciliary components or factors in ciliary signaling pathways result in PKD. A recent report suggests that the relationship between the polycystin complex and ciliary signaling is complicated, however.While ablation of primary cilia by mutation of core ciliary components results in cysts, these same perturbations done in the setting of Pkd1 or Pkd2 inactivation results in significant attenuation of cystic disease (Ma et al., 2013). These data suggest that the polycystin complex provides a suppressive signal for a novel, cilia-dependent growth-promoting pathway that is independent of MAPK/ERK, mTOR, or cAMP pathways, three effector pathways previously implicated as major drivers of cyst growth. The identities of the growth-promoting and growth-inhibiting pathways remain unknown. We have taken a systems-based approach to study Pkd1 gene function. Building on our previous work identifying markedly different outcomes in animals with induced Pkd1 inactivation before or after P12 and correlating this susceptibility with metabolic status (Piontek et al., 2007; Menezes et al., 2012), we now show that female sex is partially protective in adult-induced Pkd1 inactivation, that sex differences in metabolic status may account for this effect, and that cells lacking Pkd1 have abnormal fatty acid oxidation. Finally, manipulating diet in Pkd1 mouse models, we demonstrate a positive correlation between lipid content in mouse chow and cystic kidney disease severity. Our results therefore suggest that abnormal lipid metabolism is an intrinsic component of PKD and an important modifier of disease progression.
Institute:National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases
Laboratory:Polycystic Kidney Disease Laboratory
Last Name:Menezes
First Name:Luis
Address:31 Center Dr, Bethesda, MD 20892
Email:menezeslf@mail.nih.gov
Phone:301-451-9614
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