Summary of study ST001480

This data is available at the NIH Common Fund's National Metabolomics Data Repository (NMDR) website, the Metabolomics Workbench, https://www.metabolomicsworkbench.org, where it has been assigned Project ID PR001004. The data can be accessed directly via it's Project DOI: 10.21228/M8X98D This work is supported by NIH grant, U2C- DK119886.

See: https://www.metabolomicsworkbench.org/about/howtocite.php

This study contains a large results data set and is not available in the mwTab file. It is only available for download via FTP as data file(s) here.

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Study IDST001480
Study TitleLarge diversity in nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compatible solute profiles in polar and temperate diatoms
Study TypeIntracellular metabolites were quantified in diatom species
Study SummaryIntense bottom-ice algal blooms, often dominated by diatoms, are an important source of food for grazers, organic matter for export during sea ice melt, and dissolved organic carbon. Sea-ice diatoms have a number of adaptations, including accumulation of compatible solutes, that allow them to inhabit this highly variable environment characterized by extremes in temperature, salinity, and light. In addition to protecting them from extreme conditions, these compounds present a labile, nutrient-rich source of organic matter and include precursors to climate active compounds (e.g. DMS), which are likely regulated with environmental change. Here, intracellular concentrations of 45 metabolites were quantified in three sea-ice diatom species and were compared to two temperate diatom species, with a focus on compatible solutes and free amino acid pools. There was a large diversity of metabolite concentrations between diatoms with no clear pattern identifiable for sea-ice species. Concentrations of some compatible solutes (isethionic acid, homarine) approached 1 M in the sea-ice diatoms, Fragilariopsis cylindrus and Navicula cf. perminuta, but not in the larger sea-ice diatom, Nitzschia lecointei or in the temperate diatom species. The differential use of compatible solutes in sea-ice diatoms suggest different adaptive strategies and highlights which small organic compounds may be important in polar biogeochemical cycles.
Institute
University of Washington
DepartmentOceanography
LaboratoryIngalls Lab
Last NameDawson
First NameHannah
Address1501 NE Boat Street, Marine Science Building, Room G, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA
Emailhmdawson@uw.edu
Phone206-543-0744
Submit Date2020-09-09
PublicationsDawson et al, 2020, Integrative and Comparative Biology
Raw Data AvailableYes
Raw Data File Type(s).mzXML
Analysis Type DetailLC-MS
Release Date2020-12-09
Release Version1
Hannah Dawson Hannah Dawson
https://dx.doi.org/10.21228/M8X98D
ftp://www.metabolomicsworkbench.org/Studies/ application/zip

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Project:

Project ID:PR001004
Project DOI:doi: 10.21228/M8X98D
Project Title:Large diversity in nitrogen- and sulfur-containing compatible solute profiles in polar and temperate diatoms
Project Type:Marine Metabolomics
Project Summary:Intense bottom-ice algal blooms, often dominated by diatoms, are an important source of food for grazers, organic matter for export during sea ice melt, and dissolved organic carbon. Sea-ice diatoms have a number of adaptations, including accumulation of compatible solutes, that allow them to inhabit this highly variable environment characterized by extremes in temperature, salinity, and light. In addition to protecting them from extreme conditions, these compounds present a labile, nutrient-rich source of organic matter and include precursors to climate active compounds (e.g. DMS), which are likely regulated with environmental change. Here, intracellular concentrations of 45 metabolites were quantified in three sea-ice diatom species and were compared to two temperate diatom species, with a focus on compatible solutes and free amino acid pools. There was a large diversity of metabolite concentrations between diatoms with no clear pattern identifiable for sea-ice species. Concentrations of some compatible solutes (isethionic acid, homarine) approached 1 M in the sea-ice diatoms, Fragilariopsis cylindrus and Navicula cf. perminuta, but not in the larger sea-ice diatom, Nitzschia lecointei or in the temperate diatom species. The differential use of compatible solutes in sea-ice diatoms suggest different adaptive strategies and highlights which small organic compounds may be important in polar biogeochemical cycles.
Institute:University of Washington
Department:Oceanography
Laboratory:Ingalls Lab
Last Name:Dawson
First Name:Hannah
Address:1501 NE Boat Street, Marine Science Building, Room G, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA
Email:hmdawson@uw.edu
Phone:206-543-0744
Publications:Dawson et al, 2020, Integrative and Comparative Biology
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